Women & Suicide

When stressors exceed current coping abilities of a woman suffering, she may feel her only option left is suicide. Depression is the most common condition associated with suicide, and it is often undiagnosed or untreated. Depression affects women twice the rate of men. Many factors in women may contribute to depression, such as developmental, reproductive, hormonal, genetic and other biological differences (e.g. premenstrual syndrome, childbirth, infertility, and menopause).

About Suicidal Ideation

While males are 4 times more likely than females to die by suicide, females attempt suicide 3 times as often as males. Women also experience a much higher rate of suicidal ideation or thoughts. Just thinking about suicide can be a very isolating and scary experience. A woman thinking about suicide can feel ashamed or embarrassed and may not seek the help she needs.

Suicide is not an illness. Suicide is the result of another illness left untreated for far too long.

Visit the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention for the warning signs of suicide

If you are having thoughts of self-harm or suicide or are not sure where to turn for help, there are several free and confidential resourced for you to receive the help you need.

If This is an Emergency

If you are worried that you or someone you know may be at risk for suicide, please call your local authorities (911), contact a mental health professional, or call and talk to someone at 1-800-SUICIDE (784-2433)

Helplines

Find Treatment or Counseling

Please Know

When reaching out to treatment providers, we always encourage people to begin by connecting with resources from licensed mental health providers. While we believe in the power and efficacy of treatment, you are responsible for interviewing and selecting the provider or treatment. As we do not provide treatment services, the Gia Allemand Foundation cannot accept responsibility for any of the services provided by these or any other providers.  We are not a 24-hour helpline, nor are we trained mental health professionals. We hope to serve as a bridge to help.